Pina Colada Banana Bread

Pina Colada Banana Bread

A delectable banana bread teeming with bits of pineapple, toasted coconut, macadamia nuts and a touch of rum extract that you can trade out for the real thing. The bread is rich, dense and moist with a sweet glaze to top it off. It’s the next best thing to a pina colada.

Banana bread is one of those old-fashioned, timeless classics that never goes out of style. Just ask Google for a banana bread recipe and you’ll get 28 million of them. It’s constantly being reinvented and everyone seems to love it, even banana haters, like my Dad. … 

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Sweet Peanut Butter Bread

This recipe hardly needs an introduction. Especially if you’re a peanut butter connoisseur. Or even if you’re just a plain old peanut butter lover.

It’s a bread. Infused with copious amounts of peanut butter. That is all…. 

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Zucchini Banana Bread with Walnuts and Raisins

Every bite of this wholesome bread is jam-packed with flavor that begins and ends with bananas! The zucchini fades into the background and banana takes front and center stage. Together they add incredible moistness and replace the fat that is usually found in recipes like this – no butter or oil is required!… 

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Irish Soda Bread

Irish Soda Bread is a cinch to make and is a favorite in my house in the weeks leading up to St. Patrick’s Day! The soda in the name comes from the baking soda that is used as a leavener in a simple quickbread batter made from whole wheat and white flour, eggs, raisins, buttermilk and a touch of sugar.

I love the rustic look of the craggy, crackly crust!

It has a slightly sweet, nutty flavor that is delicious toasted with butter or cream cheese and jam for breakfast and is the perfect accompaniment for a bowl of soup or a hearty stew.

In this version I used all white whole wheat flour and swapped out half the golden raisins for dried cranberries. My preference is to use half whole wheat and half white flours, but it is quite adaptable to any kind or combination of flours you prefer. Any type of dried fruit can be used and I’ve seen some with caraway seeds and even one with sun-dried tomatoes in it.

The bread dries out fairly quickly so plan on eating it in a day or two, although toasting it easily takes care of that. If you’re family is anything like mine it won’t be around long enough anyways!

Irish Soda Bread

Irish Soda Bread
(adapted from Saveur)
2 cups whole wheat or white whole wheat flour
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
4 tbsp. butter
1 cup raisins or dried cranberries (or a mix)
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 + 1/2 cups buttermilk


1. Preheat oven to 425°. Sift together the flours, sugar, salt, and baking soda into a large mixing bowl.

2. Use a pastry cutter or two knives scissor fashion to cut butter into flour mixture, until  resembles coarse meal. Stir in raisins, breaking them apart with your fingers if needed.

3. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture; add beaten egg and buttermilk; mix in with a wooden spoon until dough is too stiff to stir. Dust hands with a little flour, then gently knead dough in the bowl just long enough to form a rough ball. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and shape into a round loaf.

4. Transfer dough to a large, lightly greased cast-iron skillet or a baking sheet. Using a serrated knife, score top of dough about 1/2” deep in an “X” shape. Bake until bread is golden and bottom sounds hollow when tapped with a knife, 35-40 minutes. Cool on wire rack. Serve bread warm, at room temperature, or sliced and toasted.

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Pumpkin Spice Bread

Pumpkin Spice Bread

This recipe comes from my nephew who brought two loaves over with him for Christmas. He baked the bread himself and told me I should take pictures for my blog! How cute is that?

One bite of the moist, dense bread and there was no doubt in my mind that it was worthy of a blog post. Packed full of pumpkin flavor, walnuts and cranberries with a fragrant, spicy aroma that reminded me of gingerbread, this is the stuff pumpkin dreams are made of. Truly, the recipe seems incredibly easy to make for such outstanding results.

My nephew brought two loaves with him and I mistakenly sent one back home with him because we had so much food to eat we never even cut into it. Once the last slice was gone I wistfully wished I could take the loaf back! I could whip up my own batch in no time at all but there’s something all the more sweet about having my nephew make it for me. It just tastes better.

Pumpkin Spice Bread
3 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
2 eggs
1 16-ounce can pumpkin
1 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup dried cranberries, dark seedless or golden raisins
1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease 9″ by 5″ loaf pan.

2. In large bowl, mix first 6 ingredients. In medium-sized bowl, beat eggs with pumpkin, brown sugar, maple syrup, and oil; stir into flour mixture just until flour is moistened. Gently stir in raisins and pecans. Spoon batter evenly into loaf pan.

3. Bake 1 1/4 hours or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool bread in pan on wire rack 10 minutes; remove from pan and finish cooling on wire rack.

Pumpkin Spice Bread

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Easy Christmas Stollen

Stollen is a German sweet bread filled with dried fruit, nuts and sometimes marzipan. It’s typically a yeast bread, but baking powder is used instead to make this quick and easy version from King Arthur Flour…. 

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Popovers (Yorkshire Puddings) with Strawberry Butter

Popovers (Yorkshire Puddings) with Strawberry Butter

Popovers are tender, eggy, airy and slightly hollow on the inside with a crusty outside. In Britain they are known as Yorkshire Puddings and are typically made with beef fat and served with roasts. The batter is thin and simple, made of flour, eggs and milk. Because steam causes them to rise it is important not to open the oven while they’re baking.

They sometimes deflate after being taken out of the oven, but I discovered a secret that will make that a thing of the past. Once the popovers are cooked, I turn off the oven, leave them in there and allow them to ‘set’ for 15-20 minutes. Then I sit on my hands, because at this point the smell has driven me crazy and I’m finding it hard to restrain myself from tearing into them. But the anticipation makes eating them all the more glorious. The popovers will still be warm and won’t sink in on themselves.

Popovers (Yorkshire Puddings) with Strawberry Butter

The strawberry compound butter is made by beating strawberries into softened butter. It can be eaten as is with the natural flavor of the strawberries as a sweetener or sugar can be added. If you don’t have strawberrries (fresh or frozen, thawed) strawberry jam can be substituted. The strawberry butter adds an extra special touch and is also delicious on pancakes, waffles, biscuits, bagels or toast. This technique can also be used with cream cheese.

These are best eaten warm straight from the oven with a smear of irresistible strawberry butter melting over them. And they are so easy to make, I’m almost certain you have everything in your pantry right now. Go forth and bake!

Strawberry Butter

Popover (Yorkshire Pudding) RecipeStrawberry Butter Recipe

Printable Recipe

Popovers adapted from Jaime Oliver

*Strawberry jam can be used in place of fresh strawberries. Start with 2 tablespoons, taste and add more if needed.

Popovers with Strawberry Butter

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